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Energy Saving Tips for Dishwasher

A dishwasher is one of the indispensable appliances in many homes today. It makes dish washing a lot easier and more convenient, thus helping you save a lot of extra time. However, the dishwasher also accounts for a big percentage in energy consumption at home. But by observing several energy-saving tips, you can greatly reduce the amount of energy you consume in dish washing.

Dishwasher Energy-Saving Tips

1. Don’t pre-rinse dishes before loading them to the dishwasher

You can save water as well as time by not pre-rinsing dishes before loading them to the dishwasher. Modern dishwashers are now powerful enough to remove all grime, grease and dirt from dishes. What you can do is to scrape-off leftover food and remove liquid from dishes and the dishwasher will take care of the rest. If there is really a need to pre-rinse, use cold water to save energy on heating.

2. Follow the instruction manual when operating dishwasher

Take time to read the instruction manual for your dishwasher and learn how to properly use it. By following the manufacturer’s instruction especially on how to load dishes, you can achieve maximum efficiency and save energy and water.

3. Utilize the “no-heat air-dry” feature to dry dishes

This feature doesn’t require heating so it lets you save energy. Use this feature if your dishwasher has one. But if you are using older models, you can simply turn off the dishwasher after the final rinse and open its door to air-dry. However, according to some users who tried this method, one major drawback of doing this is the increased spotting in dishes. But it is still worth trying; see for yourself how it will affect your dishes and how much energy you can save.

4. Dry dishes the old-fashioned way     

If you don’t like to have spots on your dishes and still save on energy, better dry the dishes the old fashioned way using a dish towel.

5. Use only the dishwasher in full loads

Regardless, if it’s half-full or fully loaded, the dishwasher will consume the same amount of water in washing so better wait until it’s fully loaded before you turn on the switch. However, be careful also not to overload it as overloading can also cause inefficiency and other malfunctions. If it takes more than a day to get a full load, you can use the rinse and hold feature if your dishwasher has. This is more economical in terms of the amount of water used in pre-rinsing each item.

6. Use the setting that has the most energy saving

Majority of newer models of dishwasher now has energy-saving cycles and settings. As most of the energy in dishwashing is consumed for heating the water, by using the “green” setting, you will be able to use less energy for the same load of dishes.

7. Practice regular dishwasher maintenance

After days or weeks of using the dishwasher, food particles and grime can accumulate in the dishwasher drain and get clogged. This in turn affects the efficiency of the dishwasher. By regularly cleaning the drain, this can maximize the full capacity of your dishwasher while consuming the same amount of energy.

These tips are not all-encompassing. You may have other tested and proven ways to save on energy in using the dishwasher. But nevertheless, by observing these simple tips, you can greatly save on energy consumption and reduce your electricity or water bill.

Thanks to Europro

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ImageYour water heater is not likely something foremost on your mind, but it can be a potential threat to your home if not given the proper attention. Here are a few things you should know about your water heater so that you can keep it well maintained.

First of all, most water heaters will only last from ten to fifteen years because they are used many times a day and have to work hard. Also, since the water heater uses so much water in a typical day, you need to check it at least once a month so that you can identify problems before they get serious. Due to the fact that water heaters pump so much water every day, most builders will put the water heater in the basement of a home, so that if there is a problem with the water heater, it does not result in water damage to the whole house. The negative effect of this placement is that it tends to create an “out of sight, out of mind” scenario, therefore it’s important to make a conscious effort to perform monthly checks. If your water heater is getting old, you may want to consider just getting a new one instead of waiting for it to break down.

You will need to inspect the water heater periodically, and here is how you do it. First, search for any wet spots or rust on the tank or anywhere around the tank. Either of these are signs of a problem. Rust can make your water heater break down and small leaks can lead to larger problems that can cause serious damage. Next, in the water heater’s main tank, sediment can build up, eventually causing it to perform below par. The water heater should have an instruction manual which will explain how to get this sediment out of the tank. Do this every few months to increase the longevity of your water heater.

Next, check both the pipes going in and out of the water heater. If you think there may be a leak, you should call a professional immediately. In most homes, your water heater will be located next to a floor drain, so that if there is a problem with the machine, it will not cause water damage to your home.

Finally, you should check the bottom drain valve. If there is any sign of rust or corrosion, this could cause problems with the water heater. Doing this quick inspection of your water heater will help you prevent your water heater from breaking down and causing water damage to your home.

Get a brand new Energy efficient water heater from morEnergy call us at 1-866-225-7204

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ImageWith the monsoon season upon us, we like to remind everyone to think about harvesting rain water.  Here is your simple guide to start saving our most sacred resource: water!

 

 

 

The Eight Principles of Successful Water Harvesting

Courtesy of Brad Lancaster-harvestingrainwater.com

1. Begin with long and thoughtful observation.Use all your senses to see where the water flows and how. What is working, what is not? Build on what works.

2. Start at the top (highpoint) of your watershed and work your way down.Water travels downhill, so collect water at your high points for more immediate infiltration and easy gravity-fed distribution. Start at the top where there is less volume and velocity of water.

3. Start small and simple. Work at the human scale so you can build and repair everything. Many small strategies are far more effective than one big one when you are trying to infiltrate water into the soil.

4. Slow, spread, and infiltrate the flow of water. Rather than having water run erosively off the land’s surface, encourage it to stick around, “walk” around, and infiltrate into the soil. Slow it, spread it, sink it.

5. Always plan an overflow route, and manage that overflow as a resource.Always have an overflow route for the water in times of extra heavy rains, and where possible, use the overflow as a resource.

6. Maximize living and organic groundcover. Create a living sponge so the harvested water is used to create more resources, while the soil’s ability to infiltrate and hold water steadily improves.

7. Maximize beneficial relationships and efficiency by “stacking functions.” Get your water harvesting strategies to do more than hold water. Berms can double as high-and-dry raised paths. Plantings can be placed to cool buildings in summer. Vegetation can be selected to provide food.

8. Continually reassess your system: the “feedback loop.”Observe how your work affects the site, beginning again with the first principle. Make any needed changes, using the principles to guide you.

Principles 2, 4, 5, and 6 are based on those developed and promoted by PELUM, the Participatory Ecological Land-Use Management association of east and southern Africa. Principles 1, 3, 7, and 8 are based on my own experiences and insights gained from other water harvesters.

These principles are the core of successful water harvesting. They apply equally to the conceptualization, design, and implementation of all water-harvesting landscapes. You must integrate all principles, not just your favorites, to realize a site’s full potential. Used together, these principles greatly enhance success, dramatically reduce mistakes, and enable you to adapt and integrate arange of strategies to meet site needs. While the principles remain constant, the strategies you use to achieve them will vary with each unique site.

For a thorough introductory description of water-harvesting principles and additional ethics see Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1 (Rainsource Press, 2006).

Thanks to Who’s Green?

If you have any great tips to rain water harvesting or water conservation, please do share in the comments section below.

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ImageDid you know that fruits and vegetables give off the natural gas called ethylene? Ethylene can affect the other fruits and veggies that they are stored next to. You don’t need to buy special bags, but you do need to know which produce doesn’t play nicely with others. Here are some tips!

Apples – Do not wash until just before eating, keep them sealed in the plastic produce bag, in the refrigerator. They give off a lot of ethylene gas, so don’t store them next to anything else.

Asparagus– can last for a couple weeks if stored properly. When you get them home, cut off about half an inch on the ends. Put enough water in the bottom of a jar or wide drinking glass to cover the bottoms about 3/4″ to 1″ (you don’t want half the stalk to sit in water). Put a Ziploc baggie loosely down over the top of the stalks to keep some of the moisture around them. Store in the fridge!

Avocados – Keep them at room temperature.  If you need one to ripen quickly, put it in a brown paper bag along with a banana.  If it is ripe and you need to slow the ripening process, put it in the fridge.

Bananas – They produce more ethylene gas than any other fruit.  Keep them away from other produce, on the counter-top, away from other produce.  Once they are ripe you can stop the ripening process by putting them in the fridge, just be sure to put them in a sealed bag.  The skin will turn black, but the fruit will be fine.

Beans (snap, string or wax) – Store in a plastic bag in the refrigerator.  Do not wash until just before use.

Berries – You know when you buy berries and they look like they have a dusty layer one them? That is called bloom, and it serves as a natural preservative.  Never wash berries until just before use.  Pick through them and throw away any berries that are bruised or molding.  Store loosely in shallow containers, cover with plastic and keep them in the refrigerator.

Broccoli & Cauliflower – These need to be kept in their wrapping/packaging and kept in the fridge.  Do not wash until just before using.

Cabbage – Keep in the fridge, in a plastic bag. Do not wash until just before using

Carrots – Whole carrots?  Wash them thoroughly.  If they have green tops, cut off all but an inch.  Wrap them in a damp paper towel, seal in a plastic bag and store in the crisper drawer.

Celery – Give it a rinse, loosely wrap it in a paper towel, then tightly wrap the entire stalk in aluminum foil and keep in the crisper.  It will keep fresh and crisp for weeks.

Cherries – Store in the fridge in a plastic bag.  Do not wash until just before eating.

Citrus – Since citrus fruits have thicker skin, they are easier to store.  They’ll stay fresh for about 2 weeks in the fridge, about a week on the counter.  It doesn’t matter if they are near other produce.

Corn – Husks on? Store loose and uncovered in the fridge.  Husks off?  Wrap in foil and store in the crisper drawer. It will keep for 1 to 2 days.

Cucumber – Store in plastic bag in the refrigerator. Do not wash until just before use.

Eggplant – Wrap in plastic and refrigerate.

Garlic – Store at room temperature. Whole heads will last 3 to 5 weeks, but once cloves are separated, they will last about 10 days.

Grapes – Do not wash until just before eating, as they also have a bloom.  Store them in the fridge, in the plastic bags they come in, or poke holes in a plastic bag to allow for air circulation.  They say they should last up to 2 weeks.

Jalapeno Peppers – Store in plastic bag, in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Kiwi Fruit – store at room temperature until ripe, then cover with plastic and refrigerate.  Will keep for about a week.

Lettuces, Leafy Greens & Spinach – Wash, wrap loosely in paper-towels, then bag it… paper towel and all.

Melons – Store at room temperature until ripe, then refrigerate. They will keep for about a week.

Mushrooms – Do not wash until just before using.  Pre-sliced? Store in the refrigerator in their original packaging. They will last for about a week. Whole?  Store loosely in a brown paper bag in the refrigerator

Onions – Store in a cool, dry place that has good air circulation.  (Store in the fridge if you don’t have such a place.) They will keep for 2 to 3 months.  DO NOT STORE WITH POTATOES.  (If next to each other they spoil faster. Who knew?)

Pears – If they aren’t ripe, store them at room temperature.  Once they ripen, place them in a plastic bag and store them in the fridge.  They will keep for about a week.

Peaches, Plums, Nectarines & Apricots – Store at room temperature until ripe, then store in plastic bags in the refrigerator until ready to eat.  They will keep from 3 to 5 days.  Do not wash until ready to eat.

Pineapple – Store at room temperature until ripe, then store in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Potatoes – Store in a cool, dry, dark place that has good air circulation. They will keep for 2 to 3 months.

ONIONS.  (If next to each other they spoil faster.  Who knew?)  Sweet Potatoes keep at room temperature for a week or in a cool dark place for about a month.

Tomatoes – Store them in a cool, dry place.  Don’t store them in plastic bags as the trapped ethylene will make them ripen more quickly. Once ripe, you can put them in the fridge to slow the ripening process, but let them come to room temperature before using them.

Zucchini – Refrigerate in a plastic bag.  Do not wash until just before using.

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Share it with all your friends 🙂 If you have any useful tips, Please share in the comments section below.

Thanks to who’s green?

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 1. Bamboo Palm: According to NASA, it removes formaldahyde and is also said to act as a natural humidifier.
2. Snake Plant: Found by NASA to absorb nitrogen oxides and formaldahyde.

3. Areca Palm: One of the best air purifying plants for general air cleanliness.

4. Spider Plant: Great indoor plant for removing carbon monoxide and other toxins or impurities. Spider plants are one of three plants NASA deems best at removing formaldahyde from the air.

5. Peace Lily: Peace lilies could be called the “clean-all.” They’re often placed in bathrooms or laundry rooms because they’re known for removing mold spores. Also know to remove formaldahyde and trichloroethylene.

6. Gerbera Daisy: Not only do these gorgeous flowers remove benzene from the air, they’re known to improve sleep by absorbing carbon dioxide and giving off more oxygen over night.

Happy Gardening… 🙂 If you know any other plants that are beneficial, do let us know by posting in the comments section. 

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Here are the latest “Summer Energy Tips” from morEnergy  to save energy. This top ten energy-saving checklist will not only save electricity, but save you money on your power bills over the hot summer months.  Since home energy costs can skyrocket during these months, keep the following tips in mind to keep your expenses under control.
Summer Energy Saving Checklist: 
1. Wash clothes in cold water to save $63 a year.
2. Install a programmable thermostat to save up to 10% on cooling and heating costs.

 3. Use your window shades. Close blinds on the sunny side in summer to keep out the hot sun, and open them in winter to bring in warm rays.

4. Turn off all lights, appliances and electronics not in use. A power strip can help turn off multiple items at once. (Sometimes the simplest things are really effective!)

5. Change to new and improved light bulbs. Reduce energy use from about a third to as much as 80% with today’s increasing number of energy-efficient halogen incandescents, CFLs and LEDs.

6. Look for the Energy Star label, the government’s symbol of energy efficiency, on a wide range of consumer products to save up to 30% on related electricity bills.

7. Use low-flow faucets and shower heads to save on water bills.

8. Clean or change filters regularly. A dirty furnance or A/C filter will slow down air flow and make the system work harder to keep you warm or cool.

9. Reduce water heater temperature to 130° F to save energy and money on heating water; and wrap the water storage tank in a specially-designed “blanket” to retain the heat.

10. Seal air leaks and properly insulate to save up to 20% on heating and cooling bills, while also increasing home comfort.

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