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The Problem with Plastics

Studies have shown that water and other beverages in plastic containers may not be safe or desirable. Chemicals in the plastics can leak out into the water. These chemicals may cause a variety of health problems such as cancers, an increased risk of miscarriage, and interference with the body’s hormonal system.

The manufacture of plastic bottles uses large amounts of energy and generates toxic pollutants. Plus, although these plastics may be recycled, millions of plastic bottles end up in landfills each year.

Metal Water Bottles Are a Better Choice

A healthy goal is to stay hydrated by drinking lots of water. It’s still a good plan to carry water with you as you travel, play sports, or go to the gym. In this era of green practices, the new focus is on staying hydrated in the most eco-friendly way.

•    Instead of buying spring water, use filtered tap water.

•    Replace those plastic bottles with portable metal water bottles.

•    Aluminum bottles, such as those made by Sigg, are safe to use and can be reused repeatedly. They can also be recycled eventually

•    Stainless steel bottles, such as those made by Klean Kanteen, are easy to clean and maintain. They can also fit into bicycle water bottle cages.

There are many sources for buying the new metal water bottles. Look in health food and natural food markets. Check out camping and backpacking supply stores. Some coffee shops carry both hot and cold bottles. And, of course, there are many online sources.

As metal bottles become more popular, there are many new brands popping up. Be sure to choose bottles that have non-toxic and non-leaching liners. Metal bottles come in a wide variety of sizes, colors, and patterns. Ideally they should be both durable and lightweight. A wise consumer always researches brands and product quality before buying.

In Summary:

– Be certain that you are choosing a bottle that does not leach, check the recycling symbol on your bottle.

–  If it is a #2 HDPE (high density polyethylene), or a #4 LDPE (low density polyethylene), or a #5 PP (polypropylene), your bottle is fine.

–  The type of plastic bottle in which water is usually sold is usually a #1, and is only recommended for one time use. Do not refill it.

–  Better to use a reusable water bottle, and fill it with your own filtered water from home and keep these single-use bottles out of the landfill. Unfortunately, those fabulous colorful hard plastic lexan bottles made with polycarbonate plastics and identified by the #7 recycling symbol, may leach BPA.

Useful Tips

•    You can carry drinking water in those metal travel coffee mugs, also.

•    Recycle your old plastic Nalgene bottles.

•    Rinse your water bottles frequently and thoroughly.

•    Cut in lemon or lime slices for extra flavor.

•    Add electrolyte powder mixes for that sports drink boost.

•    Get a bottle that can clip on to your belt or tote for easy transport.

Thanks to Who’s green

what kind of bottles you use? share your views in the comments section below.

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January:

  • Organize your home improvement files. Review warranties and product manuals to check on recommended maintenance for furnaces, equipment, appliances and tools. Mark your calendar to track scheduled upkeep and service.
  • Inspect furniture, cabinets and vanities for loose knobs, pulls and hinges. Tighten or repair as necessary. Lubricate squeaky door hinges with lightweight machine oil. Free sticky doors by trimming edges or shimming hinges with thin pieces of cardboard.
  • Fix squeaks in floors and stairs by applying weight to the area (having a partner stand on it works) and driving an 8d or 12d galvanized finish nail through the flooring into a floor joist or stringer. If you have access to the floor from underneath, glue and screw backs to the floor or treads and to the joist or stringer.
  • Look for bargains on discontinued appliances and tools. Before buying, make sure that warranties are valid.
  • Make a room-by-room inventory of everything in your house. In the event of fire, flood or other disaster, it will be important in filing an insurance claim. Photographs or video of your possessions can also be helpful.
  • Don’t close vents to crawl spaces. If you live where pipes can freeze and the floor becomes very cold, insulate pipes and under the floor. Vents play an important role in controlling condensation beneath a house.
  • Double-check insulation around exterior pipes that are exposed to freezing weather to be certain that water cannot seep under the insulation.

February:

  • Remove drain traps under sinks and clean them thoroughly. Clean pop-up drain plugs. Inspect the linkage for pop-up drains to make sure they are set properly. To adjust the linkage, squeeze the finger-operated pressure lock to release it and slide it up or down as necessary.
  • Inspect grout and caulk around tubs, sinks and showers. Chip out cracked grout and replace missing grout. Stained, discolored and mildewed caulk should be cleaned with trisodium phosphate or other household cleaner. If the caulk remains discolored, remove it and replace it with fresh, mildew-resistant caulk.
  • Refinish furniture in a heated garage or workspace equipped with ventilation fans. Otherwise, use water-based strippers, paints, stains and varnishes that are especially formulated for low odors.
  • Musty closet odors can be reduced or eliminated by removing the closet’s contents and washing walls with a diluted solution of chlorine bleach. In addition, try replacing solid doors with louvered doors. Note: If the mustiness is the result of moisture, find the source and correct it. Otherwise the problem will come back.
  • To keep valves from sticking and check for leaks, turn all water valves off and on. This includes outdoor faucets and valves to toilets, bathroom and kitchen sinks, laundry, bar, etc.

March:

  • Daylight Saving Time begins. Honor the occasion by replacing batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Review the contents of your medicine cabinets and throw away dated prescriptions and over-the-counter medicines. Be sure all medicines are out of the reach of children or contained in a cabinet equipped with childproof locks.
  • Celebrate spring by cleaning the garage. Hold a yard sale, or organize a community yard sale with neighbors. Dispose of paint thinners, household cleaners and pesticides properly. Contact your city’s department of public works to find out the next scheduled collection of hazardous materials.
  • Clean the refrigerator, inside and out, with mild detergent. Remove all trays and shelves, wash, and allow to dry thoroughly before replacing them. Remove old ice from ice-making tray.
  • After heavy rains, inspect your basement walls for signs of moisture. If you detect wetness, run a portable dehumidifier. If condition persists, consult a waterproofing contractor.
  • Check to make sure your sump pump works properly by pouring water into the pump silo to raise the float and activate the motor.
  • Test the pressure and temperature relief valve on your water heater by opening it and allowing some water to flow out. If little or no water flows out or it doesn’t shut off, replace it. Bad valves can cause explosions.
  • Spring is a good time to build a doghouse. Make sure to provide adequate roof ventilation to allow hot air to escape. And don’t use pressure-treated wood in any area where your dog might chew it.

April:

  • Inspect screens (both house and vent screens to attic or crawl space) for tears and bent frames.
  • Clean window screens. Lay them flat on a picnic table or a pair of sawhorses and scrub them with a soft bristle brush and a mild detergent solution. Rinse with a garden hose and allow to dry thoroughly.
  • Inspect outdoor structures for deterioration — especially signs of rot. Use a small awl to probe posts, railings and window sills for soft spots. If you find any, plan to replace or repair them when the weather turns fair.
  • Prepare for the outdoor cooking season by inspecting gas grills. Remove cooking grills and thoroughly clean them with soapy water and a brush with brass bristles. Remove accumulated grease from lava rocks and ceramic briquettes by turning them over and igniting the burners. Allow 10 minutes on high heat to clean the briquettes.
  • Inspect garden hoses for leaks. Make temporary repairs with electrical tape. Pry out old washers and replace them. Don’t leave hoses connected to outdoor spigots until the danger of frost is completely over.
  • Caulk open joints, particularly around windows and doors.
  • Inspect the crawl space or basement after rains for water accumulation or excessive moisture. Look for signs of water damage on the subfloor and joists beneath bathrooms, the kitchen and laundry. Find and fix leaks now or pay the price later.
  • Shut off the water to the washing machine, remove the water supply hoses and examine them and the washers. Replace worn and damaged ones.
  • Check fire extinguishers to make sure they are not outdated, have lost pressure or are damaged.
  • Check all weatherstripping around doors and windows for wear, damage or loss of flexibility. Replace material that is no longer blocking air.
  • Clean your garbage disposal. Grind two trays of ice cubes made from a mixture of one cup white vinegar to one gallon of water.

May

  • Clean gutters. Inspect gutters to ensure all spikes, straps and clips are tightly fastened. Use a garden hose to flush debris from downspouts. Make sure downspouts or splashbacks direct water at least three feet away from the foundation.
  • Wash windows, inside and out, using a solution made from three tablespoons of non-sudsy ammonia to 1 gallon of water. Don’t work in the direct sun — the solution will dry too fast and streak. To clean windows with real (not removable) grills, use a hacksaw to cut a squeegee so it fits the windowpanes exactly.
  • Have central air-conditioning unit checked according to the recommendations of the unit’s manufacturer. Replace the filter in the forced-air system. Clean debris from condenser or heat pump located outside.
  • Remove mineral deposits from faucet aerators and shower heads by soaking parts in white vinegar and scrubbing with an old toothbrush.
  • Have swimming pools cleaned. Inspect and service pool liners and filters.
  • Shop for seasonal sales on air-conditioning units and window fans.
  • Dust ceiling fan blades.
  • Set thermostats and automatic sprinkler systems to adjust for weather changes.
  • Before placing metal patio furniture outdoors, coat it with auto polish.
  • Clean your garbage disposal. Grind two trays of ice cubes made from a mixture of one cup white vinegar to one gallon of water.

June:

  • Clean and seal decks. Ideally, you’ll need three consecutive warm, sunny days. On day one, dry out the deck. Apply deck cleaner and scrub the deck on the second day and let it dry 24 hours. On the third day, apply deck sealer.
  • Hire a certified chimney sweep to inspect and clean chimneys. Doing this task now instead of the fall allows plenty of time for repairs before the next heating season. It’s also easier to schedule a sweep.
  • Wash the exterior of your house, using ordinary garden hose pressure and a mild detergent. Beware of the pressure washers — they are powerful enough to force water under the siding where it may encourage mildew and rot.
  • Caulk exterior joints around window and doors.
  • Clean lint from the entire clothes dryer vent system, from the dryer to the exterior vent cap.
  • Inspect and repair or repaint all patio and deck furniture.
  • Check operation of attic fans and roof-mounted turbine vents

July:

  • Check all exterior walls for peeling or cracked paint. If you decide to repaint your house yourself, you can cut this job down to size by painting just one or two walls per year. Typically, paint on south and west-facing walls deteriorates faster and requires more frequent recoating than paint on north or east-facing walls.
  • Carefully inspect brick or masonry siding for cracks or missing mortar. Repair with fresh mortar or concrete caulk.
  • Inspect roofing material for cracks and loose or missing shingles and repair as necessary. If you have access to attic spaces, check underneath the roof for stains that indicate leaks, especially from “flashed” areas in roof valleys and around chimneys and vent stacks.
  • Inspect the operation of automatic light timers and motion-detector systems, especially if you plan a vacation.
  • Prune trees and shrubs so that branches do not come in contact with exterior siding.
  • Clean and repair cracks in concrete driveways using epoxy patching material. Repair asphalt driveways using asphalt patching material. Seal asphalt driveways every other year.
  • Inspect foundation walls for signs of termites –tunnels or dirt bridges. If you suspect termites, contact a professional exterminator.

August:

  • Use a vacuum with a narrow nozzle to clean condenser coils on the back or underneath your refrigerator.
  • Check faucets for leaks and replace washers or repair the faucet as necessary.
  • Clean underneath range hood. Remove and clean or replace range hood filters.
  • Fix “water hammer” noises by draining the plumbing system. Open the uppermost faucet (or the one furthest from the water meter) and the lowest (or closest to the meter) and allow the water to flow to a lower-level sink or floor drain. Draining the system restores air to air chambers. Close the lowest faucet and refill the system.
  • Plan interior remodeling projects and get estimates. Plan for the work to be done in early fall

September:

  • Paint interior rooms while it’s still warm enough to leave windows open. Ditto for shampooing or replacing carpets.
  • Check heating system including filters, pilot lights, and burners, and have the system serviced by a qualified professional.
  • Clean and vacuum dust from vents, baseboard heaters and cold-air returns.
  • Remove window air-conditioning units and store them. If they are not removable, cover them with plastic to protect them over the winter.
  • Tour the outside of your house to make sure that soil around the foundation is properly graded. Soil should slope four to six inches for a distance of three feet out from the foundation walls.
  • Watch for year-end close-out sales on lawn and garden equipment.
  • Inspect storm windows for any signs of deterioration and make necessary repairs.

October

  • Detach hoses in case of freezing temperatures. Remove all paints, caulks and liquid materials from garage or garden sheds.
  • Inspect weatherstripping around doors and windows and repair or replace if necessary. Learn more about caulking and weatherstripping.
  • Set thermostats and automatic sprinklers for winter. Clean gutters after leaves have fallen. Make sure downspouts are in good repair.
  • Check gauges on home fire extinguishers to ensure a full charge. Replace if necessary.

November: 

  • When setting clocks back to Standard Time, change batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.
  • Inspect automatic garage door opener and lubricate according to the manufacturer’s directions. Make sure all bolts and screws are properly tightened and secured.
  • Check for leaks around washing machine. A prime suspect for leaks are the water supply hose washers. Inspect hoses and replace if necessary.
  • Clean dishwasher, trash compactor and counter top appliances.

December:

  • Check the operation of all ground-fault circuit interrupter outlets by pushing the “test” button. The “reset” button should pop out, indicating the receptacle is operating properly. Press in the reset button.
  • Check inside bathroom vanities and kitchen sink cabinets for moisture and other signs of leaks. Carefully inspect pipes for condensation or slow drips. Repair the plumbing system if necessary.
  • Review the family fire escape plan with every household member.
  • Unpack and test all electrical holiday decorations. Repair or discard any that do not function properly.
  • Watch for sales on tools before and after the holiday season.

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10 EASY HALLOWEEN PROJECTS THAT COST LESS THAN $5

Combine a few discount store items and stuff you’ve already got lying around the house to make devilishly inexpensive Halloween decorations.

Spooky Banner

Create an inexpensive banner using kraft paper and ribbon. Our letters were printed on card stock. Make the ruffled border with a sheet of decorative paper cut into strips, accordion-folded, then glued to the back of each letter. Punch a hole in the ruffles and thread a piece of ribbon or twine through for hanging.


Terrariums

No need for a green thumb. All you need are recycled food jars, twigs, black spray paint, a little cotton and a few toy spiders. Paint the jar lids and twigs black. Then fill the inside of the lids with dirt, twigs, spiders and cotton ghosts. Screw the jars onto the lids and place the terrariums on the windowsill Learn More

Coffee Filter Garland

This Halloween garland is made from basic white coffee filters. You just need an inexpensive needle, some ribbon or twine and a bit of time. We created chair garland, but you could make garland for a mantel, window or banister for Halloween or any occasion. Learn More

Countdown Calendar

Kids love to count down the days until Halloween. Use a bulletin board, mini paper bags and printable numbers to create this easy countdown calendar. Fill the bags with mini candy bars, gumballs or notes. Learn More

Picture Lanterns

This Halloween, line your front walkway with picture-frame lanterns. Print on vellum paper black-and-white drawings (with medical and Halloween themes)found on the Internet. Insert the prints in four dollar-store picture frames. Nail together the four frames in a square, then place a candle inside the frames. Learn More

Specimen Jars

Fill old glass jars with plastic rats, toy bugs and doll heads then add a little colored water. Fill out manila tags with the name of your specimen – shrunken heads, poisonous tarantulas, baby rats and the like – and wrap the jar with twine and the tag. Learn More

Welcome Trick-or-Treaters

Dress up your entry with a spider-web welcome sign. We removed the glass from a thrift-store picture frame, fastened small tacks onto the back of the frame then zigzagged ribbon and stretchy cotton across the tacks to create a web. Interlace some spiders and “Welcome” letters into the web for more fun! Learn More

“Dripping” Candles

Dribble glue from a hot-glue gun all over a piece of PVC pipe and a foam cup to make what looks like a long-burning candle. Insert a much-safer battery-operated tea light in the middle to make the candle glow. If the candles are placed under a black light, they will glow in the dark – perfect for any haunted house. Project To Try

Paper Lantern

To make your Halloween night or evening party really scary, embellish inexpensive paper lanterns with spiders, bugs and creepy-crawlies made from card stock. Learn More


Eight-Legged Cake

Cover a plain box cake with black icing to create a little critter and add cute spider eyes and eight polka-dot legs. This simple project is perfect for a children’s party or school gathering. Learn More

Thanks to DIY Network
Do you have any interesting Halloween ideas to share with us? Please feel free to share in the comments section below.
Happy Halloween!!! 🙂

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DIY: 10 THINGS TO DO WITH AN OLD T-SHIRT

Ten great DIY projects you can make from an old T-shirt.

If you’re anything like me, you have tons of old T-shirts laying around in your drawers collecting dust. Instead of dumping them all in a collection bin, turn them into something useful. You’ll be amazed at how many things you could actually make from a humble tee. Here are ten of our favorites.

Wrapped Bracelets
You can never have enough bracelets, and there are so many great ones you can make yourself. All you need to create these wrapped bracelets are some old tees and bangles you no longer use (or look in the thrift stores for them). Follow these simple instructions by Camilla Fabbri and start wrapping.

Market Tote
Plastic bags are slowly but surely being banned in cities around the country. This stylish market tote is great to carry with you, whether you are shopping at the supermarket or the farmers market. Follow this simple tutorial by delia creates and make one in every color.

Scarf
If you have a sewing machine, this DIY scarf is very easy to make following this tutorial by wienerdog tricks. Use one T-shirt for a monochrome, more refined look or go wild and mix colors or create a tribute piece from all those old band tees you’ve held onto since forever – the possibilities are endless.

Knotted Headband
This stylish headband is super easy to make, with nothing but a few cuts, knots, and glue. If headbands aren’t quite your thing, you can easily make it into an equally stylish belt by just making it longer. Check out this tutorial by Lovestitched for inspiration and how-tos.

Knotted Rug
I love DIY projects that look like they came straight out of a fancy design store, and this knotted flokati-style rug is a great example of that. It does take a bit of manual labor but, following this tutorial by Xoelle, it’s quite easy. And your friends will surely be impressed that you actually made it.

Necklace
Quite far from those macaroni necklaces we all made in school, this DIY necklace is simple to make with just a few tools, following this tutorial by Whole Living. Make it grown up and elegant in one color, like above, or choose a tee with a more intricate pattern or print for a funkier take on the same theme.

No-Sew Vest
If you have about five minutes to make something out of that old tee, try this simple no-sew vest by Wobisobi, which requires nothing but a pair of scissors to make. A great summer piece to throw on over your favorite tee to create a layered, casual look.

Skirt with Pockets
This DIY recycled T-shirt skirt by Out of Order is as simple as it is clever. No material is wasted – even the sleeves are used to make pockets. Use it as a simple summer skirt, or do as demonstrated in the photo above and decorate it with buttons down the front for a more dressed-up look.

Placemats
Dress up your table for a summer party with DIY placemats made from T-shirt fabric scraps. This tutorial by Creative Jewish Mom shows you how to create a simple homemade loom that you’ll use to weave the scraps together – no fancy equipment required.

T-Shirt Yarn
A great way to make use of old tees is to make them into T-shirt Yarn. It’s simple and you’ll actually end up with a ball of soft (just like your favorite tee) continuous yarn that you can then use to crochet, knit or knot. Check out this video tutorial by Relevé Design to learn how.

Thanks to Eco Salon

Let me know if you have any other interesting ideas with an old t.shirt in the comments section below:

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ImageWith the monsoon season upon us, we like to remind everyone to think about harvesting rain water.  Here is your simple guide to start saving our most sacred resource: water!

 

 

 

The Eight Principles of Successful Water Harvesting

Courtesy of Brad Lancaster-harvestingrainwater.com

1. Begin with long and thoughtful observation.Use all your senses to see where the water flows and how. What is working, what is not? Build on what works.

2. Start at the top (highpoint) of your watershed and work your way down.Water travels downhill, so collect water at your high points for more immediate infiltration and easy gravity-fed distribution. Start at the top where there is less volume and velocity of water.

3. Start small and simple. Work at the human scale so you can build and repair everything. Many small strategies are far more effective than one big one when you are trying to infiltrate water into the soil.

4. Slow, spread, and infiltrate the flow of water. Rather than having water run erosively off the land’s surface, encourage it to stick around, “walk” around, and infiltrate into the soil. Slow it, spread it, sink it.

5. Always plan an overflow route, and manage that overflow as a resource.Always have an overflow route for the water in times of extra heavy rains, and where possible, use the overflow as a resource.

6. Maximize living and organic groundcover. Create a living sponge so the harvested water is used to create more resources, while the soil’s ability to infiltrate and hold water steadily improves.

7. Maximize beneficial relationships and efficiency by “stacking functions.” Get your water harvesting strategies to do more than hold water. Berms can double as high-and-dry raised paths. Plantings can be placed to cool buildings in summer. Vegetation can be selected to provide food.

8. Continually reassess your system: the “feedback loop.”Observe how your work affects the site, beginning again with the first principle. Make any needed changes, using the principles to guide you.

Principles 2, 4, 5, and 6 are based on those developed and promoted by PELUM, the Participatory Ecological Land-Use Management association of east and southern Africa. Principles 1, 3, 7, and 8 are based on my own experiences and insights gained from other water harvesters.

These principles are the core of successful water harvesting. They apply equally to the conceptualization, design, and implementation of all water-harvesting landscapes. You must integrate all principles, not just your favorites, to realize a site’s full potential. Used together, these principles greatly enhance success, dramatically reduce mistakes, and enable you to adapt and integrate arange of strategies to meet site needs. While the principles remain constant, the strategies you use to achieve them will vary with each unique site.

For a thorough introductory description of water-harvesting principles and additional ethics see Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond, Volume 1 (Rainsource Press, 2006).

Thanks to Who’s Green?

If you have any great tips to rain water harvesting or water conservation, please do share in the comments section below.

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It’s back-to-school season, and you know what that means. Fresh notebooks, sharp colored pencils, and crisp, clean backpacks. Shopping for school supplies was my bliss as a child. That, and cookie dough. Now getting green school supplies is easy because there are so many options out there. So first things first:
1. Backpacks. Getting an eco-friendly backpack can be as simple as getting one that’s built to last a whole year, one that you won’t need to replace come November. After all, some backpacks barely last a month, let alone a whole school year. But if you’d like to go even further than that, I’ve got the backpack for you. Conventional backpacks, especially the plastic ones for little kids, can contain potentially harmful chemicals and dyes. Enter EcoGear’s EcoZoo backpacks. These backpacks feature adorable furry friends and are made from recycled and renewable materials, don’t contain PVC and are colored with nontoxic dyes. EcoGear even has a line of backpacks for older kids too (in case your eighth-grader doesn’t want to carry around a backpack shaped like a panda).
2. Crayons. Traditional crayons are made from petroleum, so why not try soy crayons this year for school? Soy crayons were developed by two inventive young Perdue students back in 1993 as an entry into a soybean utilization contest. Unlike regular crayons, soy crayons are completely biodegradable. Two brands to try?Crayon Rocks, which are virtually indestructible and fun for kids to use because of their unique shape (which is said to improve your kid’s handwriting grip too), andPrang, which sells eight crayons for only a dollar. Who says eco-friendly gear has to break the bank?
3. Lunch boxes. Where do I begin? There are just too many cute, eco-friendly ways to bring your lunch to school these days! PlanetBox’s lunch boxes, made from stainless steel, are great for older kids and picky eaters who need a variety of foods to make lunch interesting. They’re also good for kids (and adults) who don’t like their noodles fraternizing with their fruit. Another option is bento boxes, which are colorful, contain no toxic chemicals and are super easy to clean. I also love theKids Konserve lunch bags. Finally, I absolutely love the adorable Crocodile Creek lunch boxes that have held up perfectly through two school years for my toddler and are free of PVC and phthalates.
4. Water Bottle: Just say no to disposable water bottles – especially when we’re talking about putting them into kids’ lunches all week. For $10, citizenpip has a cute aluminum one
5. Pens and pencils. Another thing you can buy for your kids this year isGrassroots’ biodegradable pens. Made entirely from corn starch, these pens will completely disintegrate within a year of being thrown away. Try it out yourself in your own backyard for a nifty little science experiment. If your kids aren’t allowed to use pens in class yet, try these pencils, made from FSC-certified wood.
It’s always a good idea to include your children in your eco-friendly shopping excursion (whether it be at home or online). Let them know why you’re getting them eco-friendly gear and they’ll feel proud to take it to school every day. Remember, the eco-friendly choices you make with them today will make them responsible caretakers of the Earth tomorrow.
If you have any more Eco friendly green ideas, please share it in the comments section below.

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1. Water bottle citrus juicer

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New York designer Scott Amron, who is also the founder of Amron Experimental, has given a new level to re-purposing by creating the juicer from thrown water bottles made of plastic. The innovative juicer, dubbed Re-juicer, extracts juice like an ordinary juicer that you commonly use in your kitchen and extract fresh and delicious fruit juice by twisting it over the juicer. But, its making is quite different from the ordinary juicers. The designer made use of the lower halves of clean Poland Springs plastic water bottles and created this eco-friendly product. Since the plastic design makes it flexible, the pouring is made easier and simple without any spillage. It is though not a commercially-produced juicer, but a very intelligent way of reusing the commonly thrown away plastic water bottles.

2.Lawn Sprinkler Made from Plastic Water Bottle

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Here is one interesting project for the DIYers, which does not require any technical expertise. With a used plastic water bottle and a few old pens, you can make a nice sprinkler for your garden. You can start the project by making a hole in the cap of a 20oz plastic bottle, and this hole should be slightly smaller than your male hose attachment. Now, you have to make three rows on the bottle vertically, with each row including five holes. After you are done with it, take 15 pens and cut them to a size of 2 inches after removing the refill. Insert these pens into the bottle holes and stick them to it using some adhesive. You also need to apply some glue to the bottle cap, so that the hose attachment stays in place. Run the tap water now and your sprinkler is all ready to use.

3.Plastic Water Bottle Vase

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Why throw a used plastic water bottle into the recycle bin when you can create something unique and functional out of it. You can reuse a 20oz soda bottle to create a beautiful vase for your flowers. After cutting the bottle little below its neck, make straight cuts all around the bottle above the bottom. Then, you have to fold the strips carefully towards the outside. Turn the bottle upside down to have a uniform folding. Now, you will need to weave the strips into one another to give your vase a unique and attractive look. Check out the whole process on detail at WikiHow.

4. Pet Bottle purse

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How about making a coin purse using a plastic soda bottle? With two bottoms of plastic soda bottles and a zipper, you can create this beautiful PET Bottle Purse. The process is quite simple. First, you need to cut the bottoms of two bottles with a scissor in same size. To attach the zipper to the two bottle bottoms, you can use a thick needle to make holes for the sewing purpose. The stitching keeps the zipper intact. You can go for bottles of different colors to make yourself a collection of bottle purses.

5. Make Beads from Recycled water Bottle

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To create jewelry from the unwanted plastic water bottles, all you need is waste plastic bottles, paint or permanent markers, heat gun and craft cord or wire. You need to cut off the top and bottom of the plastic bottle, and then cut the strips across of any width to your liking. You can use either transparent or colored plastic water bottles to make strip. After that color the strips with paint or permanent marker on both sides. Once dry, you need to wrap the strips around the pliers to make a steady grip and by using a heat gun melt the strip in shape of a bead. After letting the beads cool you can string them into a metal wire or a craft cord and accessorize your self with a cool and funky bracelet or necklace.

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